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Pet Vaccinations

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Early and routine pet vaccinations are an important part of disease prevention. There are core vaccinations recommended for all pets as well as those recommended based on unique lifestyles and environments. Talk with your doctor so that a vaccination protocol can be tailored to best protect your pet.

Our hospital requires those denoted with an asterisk for admission to the hospital for elective surgery, boarding, and grooming to help protect your pet as well as our staff from contagious diseases.

  • Rabies Vaccinations for All Cats and Dogs
  • Canine Vaccinations
  • Feline Vaccinations

Rabies for All Cats and Dogs

* Rabies is a virus transmitted though saliva by either a bite or scratch that attacks the brain and central nervous system. It is almost always fatal. The rabies vaccine is the only vaccine required by law for all cats and dogs.

  • Our canine patients receive an initial Rabies vaccine good for one year, followed by booster vaccination every 3 years.
  • Our feline patients receive an annual non-adjuvant feline specific rabies vaccination. This species-specific vaccine, Merial purevax, reduces post injection site inflammation.

Canine Vaccines

* DHPPC/“Distemper” Vaccine: This vaccine provides protection against a combination of diseases and is recommended as an initial series in puppies with a booster at one year of age with subsequent pet vaccination every 3 years.

  • Distemper is a virus transmitted through contact with discharges from the eyes and nose that causes fever, decreased ability to fight infection, respiratory and neurological symptoms. This disease is often fatal.
  • Hepatitis (adenovirus 1) is a virus that affects the liver. It is transmitted through objects contaminated with urine, saliva or feces from an infected dog.
  • Adenovirus 2 is a virus associated with tracheobronchiitis.
  • Parvovirus is a highly infectious virus that is transmitted through the feces of an infected dog. It causes severe diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration and can often be fatal.
  • Parainfluenza is a virus transmitted through contact with nasal secretions of an infected dog. It typically causes a mild upper respiratory infection in adult dogs but can be severe in young puppies.
  • Coronavirus is a virus transmitted through contact with infected dog feces that causes mild and self-limiting diarrhea and vomiting. This vaccine is given to all of our puppy patients since they are more susceptible at their young age.

Leptospirosis is a zoonotic bacterial disease directly transmissible from pet to person. Infected wildlife may contaminate water sources such as ponds, streams or even puddles with urine. Pet or human contact with this urine can lead to kidney and /or liver failure. The initial immunization consists of 2 vaccinations scheduled 2-3 weeks apart, followed by an annual booster vaccination.

* Bordetella bronchiseptica is a highly contagious bacterium transmitted through aerosolized particles and is usually associated with close contact with other animals. It causes a respiratory infection commonly known as kennel cough. At Festival Veterinary Clinic, we use an intranasal vaccine that provides local immunity within the nasal passages, which is the route of infection. This vaccine is recommended once yearly for most dogs but may be given more often if exposure risk is high.

* Canine Influenza Virus is a newly emerging, highly contagious virus for which your dog has no natural immunity. It is spread through direct contact with other dogs, coughing or sneezing and contact with contaminated hands, clothing or other surfaces. Canine influenza causes upper respiratory illness including fever, cough and nasal discharge. A small number of dogs infected with the canine influenza virus develop serious complications, including pneumonia and death. Due to the highly contagious nature of Canine Influenza, it is a required vaccine for pets who come to Festival Vet for grooming, boarding and hospitalization.

Lyme Disease is a bacterium transmitted from an infected tick that causes fever, lethargy, muscle stiffness, and joint pain. Left untreated, the infection can lead to arthritis, kidney failure and heart disease. The initial immunization consists of 2 vaccinations scheduled 2-3 weeks apart, followed by an annual booster vaccination.

Feline Vaccines

*FVRCP/ Feline Distemper Vaccine: This vaccine provides protection against a combination of diseases and is recommended as an initial series in kittens with a booster at one year of age with subsequent pet vaccination every 3 years.

  • Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is a highly contagious virus transmitted through respiratory secretions of an infected cat. Symptoms include sneezing, loss of appetite, fever, and eye inflammation.
  • Chlamydia is a bacterium transmitted though eye and respiratory secretions of infected cats that causes eye infections, sneezing, tearing, salivation, and coughing.
  • Panleukopenia (distemper) is a virus transmitted though blood, urine, feces, nasal secretions and fleas of an infected cat. It causes fever, severe diarrhea, vomiting and dehydration and can often be fatal.

Cats that have access to the outdoors have additional immunization needs.

Feline Leukemia is a virus spread mainly through saliva and nasal secretions, but also through urine, feces, and milk from infected cats that attacks the immune system. This serious infection will result in weight loss, recurring illness, breathing abnormalities, general immunosuppression and eventually death. The initial immunization consists of 2 vaccinations scheduled 2-3 weeks apart, followed by an annual booster vaccination.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus is a virus spread primarily through the bite wound of an infected cat. Infection will result in weight loss, recurring illness, oral disease and general organ dysfunction ultimately leading to death. The initial immunization consists of 3 vaccinations scheduled 2-3 weeks apart, followed by an annual booster vaccination. Current technology does not allow viral testing to differentiate between natural and vaccination immunity. Therefore, in accordance with the American Association of Feline Practitioners, we advise that all cats receiving this vaccine be microchipped for future identification as a vaccinated pet.